In 1966 a momentous decision was made which would bring to an end over 1,000 years of the historic system of pounds, shillings and pence. The British public would have to get used to a new monetary system, changing from 240 pennies to 100 pennies in a pound. Here you can find out more about the impact of decimalisation on both the Royal Mint and the general public.

If these videos spark memories of the changeover then we would love to hear from you. Get in touch on social media using #decimal50 or email us at decimalisation@royalmint.com

 

‘Money we will have to get used to’ (1968)

‘Money we will have to get used to’ (1968)

The new designs for the half penny through to the ten pence piece were first unveiled to the British public in 1968.

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The first of the new coins (1968)

The first of the new coins (1968)

The first milestone in the introduction of new decimal coins came in April 1968.

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The shape of things to come (1969)

The shape of things to come (1969)

The fifty pence piece, a key development in the transition to the new decimal system, was brought in to replace the ten-shilling note.

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Preparing for Decimal Day (1970)

Preparing for Decimal Day (1970)

Planning the changeover required one of the largest public information campaigns in British history.

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Voices from the Mint

Voices from the Mint

Listen to long-serving members of staff as they tell their stories.

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Decimalisation

Decimalisation

To help people prepare for decimalisation in 1971 the government ran a huge advertising campaign which included television programs and films.

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Trial fifty pence piece

Trial fifty pence piece

This coin inscribed with the name Conway, is a trial from very early in the process of development of the fifty pence piece.

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Money Making at the Mint (1946)

Money Making at the Mint (1946)

This footage gives an indication of the conditions under which coins were struck at Tower Hill in London throughout the conflict.

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